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Passing on the Game

The Best Teacher in Basketball

By Joe Crispin 01/10/2019, 11:00am EST

The shot-clock is the best teacher of offensive basketball ever conceived by man. 

The more I watch basketball at every level of play, the more I believe that this statement is universally true. It is a key that unlocks a thousand developmental doors. I am going to list some reasons here. It is so important to focus on this, because although the United States invests more and more resources into basketball at every level, until we adopt a shot-clock at every level, we are stunting the growth and development of our players. It is not an overstatement.

The International game is played with a 24 second shot-clock. In most countries, from about 6th grade on up. And maybe younger. It's just their normal game. And though it may not seem like much, it teaches them better than any coach in the world. I am not going to elaborate on these reasons right now, but I will list them. USA Basketball and every state in America needs to take notice.

1) The shot-clock forces players to learn how to create efficient offensive scoring opportunities. 

2) The shot-clock forces all players to learn how to shoot. 

3) The shot-clock forces coaches to teach all their players how to shoot. 

4) The shot-clock forces players to embrace their offensive roles on a respective team. 

5) The shot-clock forces coaches to become better offensive teachers by forcing them to learn how to teach their players how to actually score. 

6) The shot-clock gives every player more opportunities to develop their offensive game, in every game. More passing and shooting and dribbling opportunities.

7) The shot-clock teaches teams how to play better defense by forcing them to guard better offensive actions every single game. 

8) The shot-clock leads to a game that is more fun to watch. It increases rhythm. 

9) The shot-clock saves the sanity of college coaches who are tired of watching horrible offensive basketball at the youth and high school levels and teaching college players things they should already know. (Yea, that one's personal). 

There is more, but that is plenty to get started with. I will elaborate more on these in the weeks ahead. I promise you, I am not overstating the case. The shot-clock is the best teacher of offensive basketball ever invented. Things need to change!

 

Teaching for the Future

By Joe Crispin 12/12/2018, 12:45pm EST

I want to get back to blogging here with  a simple post. A question keeps returning to mind. 

Will what we teach our kids about the nature of the game help them play it better (or at all) in 5-8 years? 

It's not as simple as you might think. I am not just talking about technicalities. Not just pivot foot and sets and defensive rotations. I am talking about the very nature of the game and the understanding required to play it at a high level. Dynamically. Multi-positional. Offense/defense. Shot-selection.

One example:  do your kids know that a catch-and-shoot jump shot (especially inside-out) is almost always a great shot? 

I am retraining my college players to believe this. Really, really, emotionally/intellectually to believe this. Why? Because as kids they were taught that the closer they are to the rim, the better the shot. But that is not true! Not even close. 

Of course, closer to the rim may help them win now, but it won't help them win later. We have to educate them on the basis of their basketball future. Take some time to think about what that means for you and for those you influence on the youth basketball front. 

Real Situations Teach Best

By Joe Crispin 09/25/2018, 11:15am EDT

Here's a simple recap of what I posted last week put in another way. 

Great, simple decisions are not easy to consistently make. 

The pros are the pros, because they play more and, in turn, make the same sorts of decisions more than anyone else. Defense and offense. All over the court. Live decision. With real defense in a real game.

Drills in isolation are not all bad, but they are not enough. Not even close. Kids need to play. More specifically, they need to play in a variety of basketball situations. 

We can often help them most by creating these various situations for them in breakdown games. What we emphasize is determined by who they are and where they are in their development. But they will often surprise you with their ability to pick things up...if you let them. 

Don't get in the way. Embrace the messiness of learning. Create new situations and emphasize 1-2 things at a time and you will be very surprised at how quickly they learn. They will begin to have a 'feel' for how to move and decide in a game that is more important than all the technical skills you can isolate in drills. 

We want our kids to just know how to play. To be able to make consistently good decisions. So our teaching must consistently put them in real-time situations. And new situations. This is a good education. Coaches and parents, please make it your own.

How to Teach How to Play

By Joe Crispin 09/14/2018, 11:30am EDT

We began our Halfcourt 3-on-3 'League' last week. As I have told many, it is one of my favorites. Kids are empowered to play and they have a ton of opportunities to touch the ball in legitimate basketball situations. If you watch carefully, you will find that they are often presented with action opportunities that they could never consistently get in a 5-on-5 game. 

All those things are great, but there is also a teaching element that I want to clarify today. The primary area of focus for us during these hours is teaching offensive and defensive team concepts. Essentially, our hour goes something like this: 

5-10 min:  Show an offensive/defensive concept that is the focus for the evening. 

20 min:  'Practice' those concepts in breakdown, but game-like situations. 

30 min:  Play. Just play. 

The reason all this is important is because in my experience, we often seem to want to teach kids concepts of play in very structured, anti-play sort of ways. Very vanilla, very obvious and controlled ways. But the big issue I have with these ways is that although they look good, they don't really work. At least not as well as I would like. 

Embedded in our hour of play is, from my vantage point, the best kind of instruction.

Less telling, a little more showing, and a lot of doing. 

Showing is good. Talking less good. Doing is best. By far. And not just doing in an obvious, do-it-the-same-way-every-time sort of way. But doing is a game-like way. Doing it with defense. Doing it on your own.

This involves more mistakes. But that also means it involves more learning in a shorter period of time. If you want to learn, really learn, how to play the game of basketball, messiness is essential. 

Think of it in terms of learning a language. The most efficient and effective way to really learn Italian is to go to Italy and sound like a idiot for months. If you are willing to 'speak' your way around, you will sound dumb, but not for long. Eventually you will get it. Bit by bit you will make mistakes, ask questions, and figure it out. You will 'catch' the language, the accents, the way to put sentences together. If you really want to take it next level, you can study the language at the same time. Do both and you will soon put great sounds together instinctively and sound like a true Italian.

Another option is to stay here in the states, visit the Italian classroom and hit the text book for the same amount of time.  Your learning may be cleaner. Nicer. And you certainly won't get worse. But you will definitely not improve as much as you would immersing yourself in Italy (you'll miss out on the food as well). 

The design of this 3-on-3 hour is a pursuit of that immersive experience combined with a little book work. In a sense, that simple sentence defines everything we try to do.

For example, this coming week we will show and play through a basic ball screen option in a 3-on-3 format. I'll keep my talking and showing to a minimum, so that the kids can actually 'do' more. We use the breakdown or controlled scrimmages to 'force' them to implement these concepts before play is live. This enables them to add a little bit to their basketball language in a shorter period of time.

The belief is that if they do this enough with wise basketball concepts,  they will instinctively start to do these things during games. Take enough time immersing yourself in good actions and you will eventually just do good things without a second thought. 

So when you see kids running around for 50 minutes, know that there is a lot more learning going on than you might think. Embrace the mess and encourage you kids to do the same. Encourage them to ask questions and make mistakes. It's the best way to learn and that's what this is all about.

Highlights from Just Play Camp

By Joe Crispin 08/09/2018, 10:45am EDT

I told our kids at Just Play camp this week that though there is a clear need for specific skill work, it is the games they play that largely determine the kind of players they will to become. 

Play comes first. And second. And third. You get the picture. 

Here are a three highlights from camp this week. 

1) Player-led communication and personal connection. 

I love walking in the gym and hearing the kids talking to one another. Even more, I love seeing them form new friendships and relationships through this play. The energy is positive energy. I hear way more from the kids than I do from the coaches. Why? Because they own the games. And the teams. And even the rules. 

Sure, we throw a ton of options their way and highlight different ways to play (especially the first few days). But then the onus is on them. And they love it. 

But here's the thing:  they do not get to this often enough! 

2) "Dunk ball." 

We have two rims we can lower. Elijah (my son) said his favorite game was "21" on a 6ft rim (maybe 6.5). 

Is that good for his development? I think so. It forces creativity and touch around the rim and from the perimeter. It diverse their skills and feel for the game. It forces them to be creative off the dribble and with their shot attempts. And most importantly...it's fun! They like it. 

But when I asked our group how many consistently play basketball on lower rims, not even a third raised their hands! This is a problem. I played hours upon hours of basketball with my friends on low rims. And I think it proved incredibly helpful. We create boring players by always playing the same games. We need to diversify. 

3) 3-on-3 Guards vs. the Bigs. 

This is another one I got from Elijah. Their group apparently chose to play the 3 smallest players vs. the 3 biggest players during one of their 3-on-3 times. Both teams ended up with strategies for defense and offense (pack the paint, protect the 3). I heard all about it and could not help but ask who won. 

The answer? No idea. Probably the big guys, but they lost track of the score. No one really cared. They just had fun playing.

Would any coach create that game during a practice? Would any coach make those teams? Probably not. And maybe they shouldn't. But that's just the point. If all our kids do is play or practice under the direction of the coach, they will never enjoy those moments. 

And that's a much bigger problem than we might think. And it's everywhere. In every sport. All over the US. We devise their great practice plans, but they grow stale quickly. They are often predictable and adult-oriented. 

The instincts of our kids are often better than we think. We are wise to give them the time and space to do what they want. It is more important to their development (on so many levels) than we can imagine.