Three lies are everywhere in youth sports. As a parent or a coach, ask yourself if you are guilty of believing them. 

1) More is better. 

I understand why we believe this, but we have to be careful how far we take it. It seems to me that most people are convinced that in order to keep up with others or maximize potential, our kids must do more, more, more! Especially when it comes to organized activities.

The business of youth sports convinces us of this, but it’s not true. There is often a point of diminishing return. Rest and rejuvenation is needed. Time for free play. The extra day or two a week may not make them improve as much as you think. In fact, it may make them worse in the end. More isn’t always better. 

2) Bigger (or farther away)  is better. 

The bigger the tournament or the longer the distance, the better it is. Or the bigger the program name or sponsor, the better it is. Nope. Not even close. If you aren’t dominating things locally, why travel a few extra hours and pay more money to get beat? I just don’t get it. Bigger isn’t always better. In fact, it is often worse. It costs more and gives you less. Maximize the small opportunities in front of you and you may be surprised how far you can go. 

3) We need to get there faster. 

This may be the worst one. We need our kids to get better now, dominate now, work harder now, be the best on the team now. But why? What are we after? If it’s a marathon, who cares who is in the lead in the first 3 miles? Or 8 Miles? Or 12 miles? Or more? 

I just don’t get this. I see constant descriptions for youth camps that promise they are going to change your kid’s jump shot or his game or his confidence. In what? A week? A season? That’s ridiculous. It’s a borderline lie. That is not how development works. I may adopt a new description for every season program we have. It goes like this…

“You kid will get a little bit better and should enjoy the game a little bit more.” 

How’s that sell for you? So life-altering, I know, but it’s true. That’s how it works. No dramatic, crazy steps. Just a step or two ahead in their development. That’s all. And that should always be enough. 

Stop believing these lies. They are everywhere today. Our kids need us to believe the truth and to enjoy the process day-by-day.

RECOMMENDED READS

The Latest From Joe

WTYB – #3 – Man-to-Man Defense

I hope this post finds you well and enjoying your season. My theme throughout the season (and really all of youth basketball) is winning...

Washington Township Youth Basketball – #2

One of our goals this youth basketball season is to help more young players win the long-game of basketball development. There is so much...

Introductory Email – Washington Township Youth Basketball

Greetings everyone, My name is Joe Crispin. I am the owner and director of Crispin Basketball and the current head men’s basketball coach...

Get Beneath the Game

We are often radically unaware of our own intellectual assumptions. In fact, it takes a lot of thought and reflection to clarify what it...

Learning the Language

Below is an email I shared with the parents of our players in our fall half court 3-on-3 league. Hello everyone, We have one more week of...

Parental Anxiety

Youth soccer game today. 11-year-old ladies. No lie: the amount of parental and coaching anxiety present was disturbing. Naturally, it...

Ingredients for a Good Practice

This is helpful. Ingredients of a Successful Practice

Read John O’Sullivan

If you are involved in youth sports at all, it is wise for you to read John O'Sullivan on a consistent basis. His Changing the Game...

Announcing our 2019-2020 Partnership with the Washington Township Boy’s Basketball Travel Program

I am excited to announce our recent partnership with the Washington Township Boy's Basketball travel program. During the 2019-2020 season,...

Fall Events in Context

Fall Events in Context Anytime we create a new program or enter a new season of the year, I go into re-evaluation mode. I start asking...

@2019 CRISPIN BASKETBALL | SITE DESIGN DGCWEB.COM

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This